FAQs for students


Here you'll find information about studying at LSE during COVID-19, including teaching and learning during the academic year 2020/21, getting tested on campus, and what updates to UK guidance means for you.

Update 16 November

In light of the UK government's guidance on student movement and plans for the end of term, LSE will continue with face-to-face teaching and learning until Saturday 5 December. For the last week of Michaelmas Term, 7-12 December (Week 11), all teaching and learning will move online, in line with government guidance.

Campus and the Library will remain open providing in-person services, with regular term-time hours in operation until 12 December.

In line with government guidance, we’ll switch from our current testing regime to mass rapid testing at the end of November. This is to help students make informed decisions about travelling, as well as accommodate those who may test positive for COVID and need to self-isolate before travelling. 

These arrangements have been put in place for the end of Michaelmas Term, to allow students who plan to travel the opportunity to get tested and make informed choices about their plans.

Winter break information and guidance

Will teaching move online for all students before the end of term? When will this happen at LSE?

The UK government has asked universities to move all teaching online by Wednesday 9 December. At LSE, the final day of in-person teaching will take place on Saturday 5 December. All teaching for the final week of term (Week 11, from Monday 7 – Saturday 12 December), will move online. 

Campus and the Library will remain open providing in-person services, with regular term-time hours in operation until 12 December. We’ll share services that can be accessed and hours outside of term time, once available. 

What is the UK government’s student travel window, and when am I expected to travel home?

The UK government is advising that all students who are travelling from a term time address to another UK address do so during what it calls a ‘student travel window’, from 3-9 December. You can read the full UK government guidance online.  

At LSE, the final day of in-person teaching will take place on Saturday 5 December. All teaching for the final week of term (Week 11, from Monday 7 – Saturday 12 December), will move online. We strongly encourage students to follow LSE’s testing programme before you travel for the winter break. 

I have a flight / train reservation / other mode of transport booked for dates outside of the student travel window. What do I do?

 We recognise that travel for international students is less flexible, and travel dates may fall outside of the UK government’s ‘student travel window’.  

International students are not expected to change your travel arrangements if it is not practicable for you to do so. Instead, we advise you to: 

  • Get tested so you can travel on your intended date. The government has advised that students should take two rapid tests with a minimum three-day gap in-between, and that they travel within 24 hours of their second negative test, to reduce risk of transmissions during this period. Remember, you will need to self-isolate for 10 days if you test positive.
  • Continue to follow social distancing guidelines (both LSE guidance and UK-wide rules) to minimise your risk of catching COVID-19. 

We know some international students need a negative PCR test before they can travel home. View the FAQ ‘Will LSE be able to provide PCR tests for students travelling internationally?’ for more information about this. 

Please note, however, that travel under the restrictions which are in place until 2 December, travel is not permitted. Therefore LSE will not be able to provide students with PCR tests for travel which takes place before the national restrictions end on 2 December.

How and when can I get tested, and when should I travel?

If you are travelling internationally  

Students travelling internationally can book a PCR test.  

  • You can book your test from 24 November 
  • Testing begins on 30 November
  • You will receive your results 24-48 hours after your test 
  • Many countries require your test to be taken a maximum of 72 hours before your scheduled arrival time, but you must check the local requirements in the country where you plan to travel 
  • We will not be able to provide PCR test certificates for any travel taking place before 3 December, when the current national lockdown has ended.  

 If you are travelling within the UK 

You’ll need to take two rapid tests, with at least 3 days between each test.  

  • You can book your test from 26 November 
  • Testing begins on 28 November 
  • Appointments for your second test will be available from 2 December 
  • If your tests are negative, you should travel within 24 hours of receiving your second test result. However, please note that you may not depart until 3 December, when the current national lockdown has ended. 

What will happen if I travel without taking a test? Are tests mandatory?

Tests are not mandatory for travel within England or for leaving the UK. However, you should consider the possibility that if you do not have a test, even if you feel well, you may be infected with COVID-19 and inadvertently pass it on to others who could be affected by it more than you. If you travel in these circumstances you will be putting other passengers at risk, as well as friends and family at your destination. We strongly recommend you get tested before you travel. 

If you travel internationally without a test, you may be required to quarantine for 14 days on arrival. You are responsible for checking the local requirements in your destination country. 

I'm travelling within the UK - why do I need to take two rapid tests?

Rapid tests are not as sensitive as PCR tests, but they do produce a result much more quickly. In the early stages of an infection, you may not release enough virus for the rapid test to detect your infection.

By repeating the test at least 3 days and, ideally, 4-5 days after your intitial  test, the disease should have developed, and the virus levels are more likely to reach a detectable level.

Will LSE be able to provide PCR tests for students travelling internationally? Is there a fee for the Certification of the PCR test?

Yes - LSE will provide PCR tests for students who need them to travel home. 

There is no charge to LSE students who require a test for travel as these costs are being met by the School. You can choose to take the test from a private clinic at your own expense.

Please note, however, that travel under the restrictions which are in place until 2 December, travel is not permitted. Therefore LSE will not be able to provide students with PCR tests for travel which takes place before the national restrictions end on 2 December.

 

I will be travelling outside the UK after the 10 December, will LSE still be able to provide me with a PCR test and certificate?

Yes. We will continue to offer this service throughout the remainder of Michaelmas Term, until 18 December. Please note that the current guidance is for the main test period, where we expect high volumes of tests to be carried out. Further guidance on booking tests and their location will be issued in due course. 

I have already tested positive for COVID-19, and have completed my self-isolation, do I need to take another test?

No - you should not take a test if you have already tested positive for COVID-19. Experts advise not to take another PCR test  within 90 days of your first positive test as individuals who have recovered may continue to shed fragments of virus (these fragments cannot transmit the disease) in sufficient quantities to test positive again. In some cases, these fragments can also be detected by rapid tests too. 

If you are travelling internationally, you should contact authorities in your destination for advice on what you should do if you are in this situation. LSE will help you to provide any further evidence that might be required.

What happens if I test positive? Will I have to stay at LSE over the Christmas break?

The UK government has chosen 3-9 December as the travel window as it allows students who test positive to self-isolate and still have time to return home after the self-isolation period is complete. You can read more about the government guidance on testing and travelling at the end of term at this link

What happens if I test positive and can’t travel on a pre-booked flight/ train / other mode of transport?

If you are an international student planning to leave the UK over the break, UK government guidance states that students should not travel if they have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) or are part of a household group which is self-isolating. 

We strongly advise students to continue to follow social distancing guidelines (both LSE guidance and UK-wide rules) to minimise your risk of catching COVID-19.  

You should consider when you will need to get tested so you can travel on your intended date, remembering that you may need to self-isolate for 10 days if you test positive. The government has advised that students should take two rapid tests with a minimum three-day gap in-between, and that you travel within 24 hours of their second negative test, to reduce risk of transmissions during this period.  

We are looking at ways we can support students if you are unable to travel home due to a positive coronavirus test. We’ll share more details of this support in due course. 

What happens if someone in household or another close contact tests positive for coronavirus?

You should continue to follow UK government and LSE guidance if someone in your household tests positive, or you are contacted by LSE Trace that you have been in close contact with someone who has, you should get tested.  

You must abide by the following rules on movement and self-isolation after a test: 

  1. If you test positive for COVID-19 you are required by law to immediately self-isolate for a period of 10 days at your term-time address. We will continue to support you and we will time the testing period so you still have time to return home to most destinations before the holidays after self-isolating.  
  2. If at the time of testing you have been identified as a "close contact" of someone in your household who has tested positive, you should book a test. Once you’ve had a test you should immediately return to your term-time address. If you test negative and you have no symptoms you must still self-isolate for 14 days but this can be done at your home address if you wish to do so, taking into account the risk of transmission to your family. You should only use public transport if you have no other option. You should strictly follow safer travel guidance for passengers.   
  3. If you test negative on both occasions and you are NOT a close contact of someone who has tested positive, you can travel home by any mode of transport and do not have to undertake any further periods of self-isolation. We encourage you to travel shortly after the second test as while the negative test indicates that you are not infected at that point in time, it is not a guarantee that you will remain uninfected. You should continue to take precautions to avoid infection including wearing a face mask, washing your hands regularly, not touching your face and maintaining 2m social distance. If, after travel, you subsequently develop COVID-19 symptoms, or are alerted by NHS Test & Trace that you are a close contact of a case, you should immediately self-isolate at your new location and get tested. 

More information about what happens if a member of your household or close contact tests positive is available in the UK government’s Student movement and plans for the end of term guidance.  

I’m planning on staying in halls / in London over the Christmas break. What support is available to me?

Although we have students staying in London over the winter break every year, we’re expecting greater numbers to do so this year. We’re exploring activities both in halls and for students in private accommodation over the break to provide social events and opportunities if you’re staying in London. The Students’ Union is also planning activities too, so you can make the most of your LSE community over the break. 

We’ll provide further updates on what we’re planning before the end of term.

How will you help students to return to campus in January?

We’re waiting for further government guidance, but we are already planning how we can safely welcome students back to campus for Lent Term. We’re exploring the possibility of testing all campus-based students and staff at the beginning of term, but we’ll provide more information about this in due course.  

We intend to resume in-person teaching and learning on Monday, 18 January, first week of Lent Term. On Wednesday 18 November, we will write to all students to ask about their initial intentions for studying online or in-person for the Lent Term.  

Studying at LSE during Michaelmas Term


What does the England-wide lockdown mean for me and my studies?

What does the England-wide lockdown mean for me? 

The UK government are introducing four-week England-wide national restrictions from Thursday 5 November to Wednesday 2 December 2020. During this time, in-person teaching and learning can continue, but other services outside of LSE, such as non-essential shops and facilities will close. 

Supermarkets and other essential shops will remain open, but all hospitality venues will close, apart from for takeaway and delivery of food and drink. 

Indoor social gatherings are not permitted with people who are not part of your household and you should only meet one other person from another household outdoors in a public space. If you can, walk or cycle rather than use public transport.  

Full guidelines of the England-wide lockdown are available at this link.  

Can I travel to London from parts of the UK to study during national lockdown restrictions?

A number of students commute from their family home to LSE, and can still do so for educational purposes during this time. You should make sure that you take account of all public health guidance on safer travel, so that you and your fellow passengers stay as safe as possible. 

What will happen to in-person teaching if there are further national or local lockdown measures introduced? 

The safety and wellbeing of our community is our priority in all our decision making, and we will continue to monitor risk levels, and make changes to how teaching is delivered based on the situation within LSE. LSE Trace, our internal trace and isolate system, will help us make sure we are taking necessary precautions, should we need to do so, at the right time for our community.  

We are currently delivering a blended model of in-person and online teaching, with some students already being taught fully online. We already have in place robust measures to deliver high-quality and engaging teaching and learning for those studying remotely, which means we can adapt quickly and effectively to pivot to online learning for the entire LSE community if needed.  

What online teaching looks like will vary slightly depending on your department, and the most effective model for your particular discipline. If we need to move teaching online, we will contact you to let you know what you need to do to fully engage with online learning.  

What happens if I come to campus and London moves into Tier 3 or there is a national lockdown in the UK? 

Education provision doesn’t change under Tier 3 restrictions in the UK, so teaching can still happen in-person. However, we will always put the wellbeing of students and staff first, taking any necessary action based on what is best for our community and the situation at LSE. Also, it is possible that rules change and that UK government guidance would prompt us into providing all teaching and education online. This may, for example, happen if there were another national lockdown in the UK. 

This is why it’s so essential to follow UK and LSE rules, to help keep campus open. We all have a role to play and everyone’s efforts can make a huge difference. 

Will I have to stay in London over the Christmas break?

The UK government has said it does not plan to stop students from travelling home over the Christmas break, with other measures such as moving teaching to fully online for the final week of term proposed as a potential alternative. However, restrictions and changes to guidance is subject to change, so we cannot say with certainty what the situation will be like in December. 

Taking a break, and spending time with friends and family is important, so wherever possible we will work to avoid a situation where students cannot leave London. Whilst this does not currently seem likely to happen, we are prepared for all eventualities.

What can I expect from Michaelmas Term 2020?

LSE’s campus and halls of residence are open, with a range of enhanced safety measures in place to protect and support you. 

Teaching and learning

To ensure an excellent educational experience, we are taking a flexible approach to your teaching and learning throughout the Michaelmas Term. Here are some key elements that will shape your term:  

Small in-person classes, seminars, tutorial groups, as well as Harvard style teaching sessions, will run on campus where possible, all in socially distanced environments. These activities, as well as other student support, will also be accessible to students unable to access campus if there is a delay to you joining us in London. 

Lectures will be delivered online for Michaelmas Term 2020. All lectures will be recorded and made available for you to access off-campus. 

All programmes will continue to maximise students’ ability to work together, both online and on campus, and contribute safely to your learning community. A mix of interactive activities between classes will give you the opportunity to connect with our world-leading faculty, share ideas with fellow students and engage with LSE’s rich education and research culture.  

Opportunities outside of the classroom

We know your experience at LSE is shaped outside of the classroom too, and we will offer you a range of exciting opportunities to develop skills and try new things. These include giving back through volunteering, developing your entrepreneurial ideas via LSE Generate, shaping your community through LSE Students’ Union activities and societies and our new online public lecture programme. 

Enhancing health and safely

Across campus and halls of residences, we will introduce enhanced health and safety measures. Where appropriate it is likely that we will go beyond government guidance, based on scientific advice and the expertise of our academic faculty. 

Read the 'What's been done to make campus as safe as possible?' FAQ below, or watch how we're putting safety measures in place to make LSE COVID-secure.

Supporting your studies and your wellbeing

We are committed to working in partnership with you to enhance your experiences and Disability and Wellbeing Services, Careers, Student Advice and LSE LIFE will continue to be available to guide you through the next academic year and beyond through excellent online and in-person services where possible.  

Studying remotely

We do recognise that it may be difficult for some students to travel internationally to London for the start of term and support will be put in place so that you can access online provision in Michaelmas Term if this is the case. 

What happens if I need to self isolate?

Take a look at our self-isolation guidance for information and support if you need to self-isolate.

If you're staying in halls, our halls of residence webpages provide more information on the health and safety measures we have put in place for COVID-19.

Will I have to quarantine when I come to London?  

You may have to quarantine when you arrive in London, depending on where you’re travelling from. Visit the UK government website for more information and advice.  

If you need to quarantine because of travel, you’ll be able to access teaching online until you can join us on campus. However, you are strongly advised to arrive in sufficient time so your quarantine is completed by the start of term so you can access teaching on campus. 

What information is there for doctoral students?

Visit our dedicated COVID-19 advice page for research students, where you'll find guidance on vivas, research plans, Tier 4 visas and more.

It also includes information about support available to you as a research student.

Can I move to online teaching in Michaelmas Term?

In exceptional circumstances, you may be able to study remotely for the rest of Michaelmas Term 2020. This will depend on the department(s) that is / are running your courses and available online capacity.  

This decision will need to be taken in discussion with your course convenor(s), department and academic mentor.

Lent Term 2021 arrangements

Mode of study and coming to London for Lent term - including visas, travel, local restrictions, quarantine, fees and more

Can I change my mode of study for Lent Term? 

We expect students to join us in London if they can for Lent Term 2021, so that you can access flexible teaching and learning that mixes in-person activities with some online provision.   

If there are reasons you cannot study in-person, for example due to health / medical–related issues, or other COVID-19 related circumstances outside of your control, you can access online teaching during Lent Term. We will allow you to do so without asking for evidence to validate your decision. If you access online teaching in Lent Term, we cannot guarantee your timetable will be suited to your local time zone. 

All students need to let LSE know your intended mode of study by 30 November, whether you are joining us in London or studying online in Lent Term. You will then need to finalise your mode of study before the start of Lent Term.  

Before you confirm your mode of study, think carefully about existing legal or regulatory obligations that you have already signed up to, such as visa conditions, scholarships and loans, and accommodation. If you are an EU student, under current rules you will need a visa post-Brexit if you do not take up residence in the UK before 31 December 2020. 

You can receive advice from the Advice Team in Student Services.

Can I change my mode of study during Lent Term?  

After you finalised your mode of study at the start of Lent Term, you will not be able to switch to a different form unless there are exceptional circumstances. This decision will be made at local levels, by your home department and the department that is teaching your courses, if the two are different.  

If you have to self-isolate during Lent Term for any reason, you will be able to access online teaching during this time. Please speak to your department or programme adminstrator about this.

There is still a possibility that the School will move to purely online teaching. In that case students would be allowed to study online, but if it’s a short period of online-only teaching you may be discouraged from travelling home.

When do I need to be in London to be eligible for the new Graduate Route visa to work in the UK after I graduate?

UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) have said that to potentially be eligible to apply for the new Graduate Route visa in 2021, you must be in the UK prior to the 6 April 2021 and complete the final part of your degree in the UK. 

For visa advice, contact the International Student Visa Advice team (ISVAT) directly. 

Can I go home if I move to study online? 

The UK government has called for students to stay at their term-time residence or address rather than travel home, to prevent the spread of coronavirus and to protect others. You can read the full letter from the Universities Minister to students, outlining government guidance at this link.

Read further UK government advice for more information. 

If I study for a full year online, will I get a discount? 

In May 2020, the Universities Minister Michelle Donelan MP announced that there would be no reduction in fees for students, as long as they received high quality teaching online.  

For 2020-21, we are ensuring high-quality and engaging learning experience for all students, no matter where you are in the world. For this reason, fees will remain the same regardless of your mode of study.  

Will there be a reduction in fees if teaching moves online?  

In May 2020, the Universities Minister Michelle Donelan MP announced that there would be no reduction in fees for students, as long as they received high quality teaching online. For 2020-21, we have ensured all teaching is online-ready, through our Curriculum Shift programme, allowing us to deliver a high-quality and engaging learning experience for all students.   

COVID rules and guidance - including how to get tested at LSE and the UK guidelines

Will you still be running testing on campus? 

LSE has recently moved to a rapid testing service across four sites. Testing is one of the most effective ways for us to prevent, protect and minimise risk on campus and in halls of residence.

LSE has transitioned from PCR testing to a quicker COVID anti-gen test, which will produce results in 15-20 minutes.  In addition to the central testing site on campus, we have opened three additional test sites. So, if you are a student in Halls of Residence or private accommodation you can have a test closer to where you live. 

We are continuing to monitor the situation and are fully prepared to continue testing into Lent Term if required. Visit the LSE Trace and test pages for more information.

What are the rules and restrictions in England?  

It is too early to say what the situation will be in Lent Term, but the government has made it clear that in-person teaching should continue, where possible.

Current guidance sees in-person education continuing during the four-week England-wide national restrictions in place (from Thursday 5 November to Wednesday 2 December 2020). During this time, in-person teaching and learning can continue, but other services outside of LSE, such as non-essential shops and facilities will close. 

Supermarkets and other essential shops will remain open, but all hospitality venues will close, apart from for takeaway and delivery of food and drink. 

Indoor social gatherings are not permitted with people who are not part of your household and you should only meet one other person from another household outdoors in a public space. If you can, walk or cycle rather than use public transport.  

Full guidelines of the England-wide lockdown are available at this link

What happens if I test positive for COVID-19? 

If you test positive for COVID-19, you should: 

Do not come to campus until your self-isolation period is over, and you are feeling well. Visit the LSE Trace and testing webpages for more guidance.  

What happens if I have COVID-19 symptoms? 

Do not come to campus until your self-isolation period is over or you receive a negative test, and you are feeling well. Visit the LSE Trace and testing webpages for more guidance. 

Will students be penalised for not following the rules? 

It is very important if you have symptoms of COVID-19 or a positive COVID-19 test you stay at home and do not go out.

The Student Code outlines the steps you’ll need to take if you feel unwell. You should always follow the guidance in the Student Code to help to keep the LSE community safe and well and keep the LSE campus open and running.

If you’re found to be in breach of the Code, it is potentially a disciplinary matter and will be taken seriously by the School.

In addition, the UK Government could fine you up to £10,000 if you do not stay at home and self-isolate following a positive test result for COVID-19 or if you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace and instructed to self-isolate. Read more about the UK Government penalties for breaking self-isolation 

Halls of residence, accommodation and fees

Will I be able to move into halls if I’ve been studying remotely for Michaelmas Term? 

Yes, there are spaces in halls available for Lent Term 2021. You can find a list of available accommodation online

What happens if there is an outbreak in my hall?  

We are working hard to minimise the risks to everyone in the LSE community, including our halls of residence. LSE trace, our trace and isolate system, helps to identify individuals who have been in contact with those who have suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19. By following guidance on campus and in halls of residence, we can all minimise our risk, and help to avoid large-scale transmission.  

If an outbreak does occur, we will implement plans to minimise the risk for everyone in the hall. If this happens, you may be asked to self-isolate, even if you feel well. The teams in halls will make sure you have everything you need to keep safe and well, from cleaning products to ensuring you have access to nutritious food. If this happens, we’ll keep you updated with information about what you need to do, and what to expect. 

Find out more about the measures we're taking in halls to protect you.   

If I move to studying remotely, will I get my accommodation fees for Lent Term refunded? 

If you make a decision to study remotely, this will not release you from your accommodation fee obligations.

If you have signed an accommodation contract, either with LSE, or with a private hall of residence, or with a private landlord, and you want to leave this accommodation, you will be liable in full for your fees unless you find a replacement. 

If you are resident in an LSE Hall, you must ensure that your replacement is an LSE student who does not already have an accommodation contract, and that there are no prior vacancies in your hall, as these will be filled first.

If you are in a non-LSE owned / private accommodation you’ll need to speak to your housing provider or landlord. LSE Students’ Union Advice team can provide you with specific support on housing issues.

Registration and arrival on campus

I have concerns about my visa - what should I do?

Our International Student Visa Advice Team (ISVAT) have a dedicated FAQ page for coronavirus (COVID-19) immigration advice for current and prospective students.

If your question is not answered in their FAQs, use their query form to contact the team for advice.

What information is there about halls/housing?

If you're looking to book LSE student accommodation, please visit this page on how to book, cancellations and changes, and how COVID-19 measures may affect your accommodation.

If you live in halls or have recently moved out, this page explains the support that's available, what fees you have to pay, what to do if you've moved out, how to collect your belongings and other things that may affect your stay in halls during the coronavirus pandemic.

How do I let LSE know if I can’t arrive on campus for the start of term? When do I need to arrive by?

If you are not able to make it to London for the start of Michaelmas Term due to travel restrictions, visa delays, health/medical–related issues, or other COVID-19 related circumstances outside of your control, you will be given access to online teaching until you are able to travel to campus.

It is currently not expected that this fixed period of remote study will extend beyond the end of the Michaelmas Term. We expect all students to arrive on campus for in-person teaching at the start of Lent Term (Monday 18 January 2021). 

Studying remotely for some or all of Michaelmas Term

LSE has introduced a new online registration process for 2020/21, which means that you can be a fully registered student without being on campus. 

Students studying online will also have access to support from a range of LSE services. While we will try to provide as much as we can to students studying remotely, there may be some activity which we cannot offer online. Examples of these are likely to include work and volunteering opportunities, as well as access to some on-campus events. 

If you need to study remotely for some or all of Michaelmas Term, you should also check, and take responsibility for, any other arrangements that may be impacted by a period of online study.

These may include:

  • Accommodation contracts
  • Scholarships or loans
  • Visa conditions for international and EU students (who, post-Brexit and under current rules, would need a visa if they do not take up residence in the UK before 31 December 2020). The coronavirus immigration FAQs have further information about this, and you can contact the International Student Visa Advice Team if you need further advice.

It is also your responsibility to ensure that you are able to study remotely in an appropriate environment.

Why has LSE changed the Conditions of Registration?

The School does not alter the Conditions of Registration very often. We have set out in the updated Conditions some of the scenarios where it may be necessary to do this: in particular, we are mindful that government advice and guidance from regulatory bodies may change over time, as the pandemic evolves.

The health and wellbeing of our student community is our top priority and therefore it may be necessary to adjust the Conditions once again. We will always make every effort to keep changes to a minimum and to notify students in good time of any changes that are going to be made.

If I arrive after the start of term, can I still access Welcome information?

We will be providing much of our Welcome activity, videos and presentations online this year so you will be able to access them wherever you are and whenever you arrive on campus.

We will also be running some on-campus activity throughout the term to ensure that all our students are welcomed to LSE, regardless of when they arrive.


Your LSE education

How will I attend classes, seminar and lectures?

Classes and seminars

We will run classes, seminars and tutorial groups, as well as Harvard style teaching sessions, face-to-face on campus in a socially distanced environment, wherever possible. These classes will also be accessible by students unable to access campus in the early weeks of the term. 

Where departments are running synchronous classes/seminars, they will run at least twice so that students in different time zones can engage with them at the start of term.

As term progresses, we expect all students to take part in face-to-face classes, seminars and tutorial groups on the LSE campus. 

Lectures

All lectures will be delivered online for the Michaelmas Term.

All lectures will be recorded and made available for you to access wherever you are.

Will I be able to work with fellow students and faculty?

All students will have the opportunity to work together between classes in Peer Study Groups on tasks or activities (academic and social).

I will not be able to study in the evenings or weekends due to caring or work commitments. What can I do?

We aim to timetable classes/seminars during regular hours on weekdays as far as possible. We will only schedule classes/seminars in the evenings and weekends when there is no other option. 

Where possible, we aim to ensure that the classes/seminars scheduled in the evenings and at weekends have alternative classes/seminars timetabled during weekday hours.

For undergraduate classes in which we can achieve this (keeping in mind that we will not be able to achieve this for all courses), you should be able to request a change to your allocated class via LSE for You. For graduate seminars, you should be able to select an appropriately timed group via LSE for You or via your department where possible.

How will LSE ensure high-quality teaching and learning?

Experts in our Eden Centre for Education Enhancement have guided the development of our flexible approach to teaching and learning to ensure that you benefit from LSE’s high standards in education in a safe environment.

Our flexible teaching approach will be subject to our stringent quality assurance processes, ensuring that there is no compromise on the rigour or standard of LSE degrees.

We will continue to apply our validation, monitoring and review mechanisms to assure the quality of our courses and programmes.

What are the measures you’re putting in place to uphold academic standards in online assessments? 

Students agree to uphold academic integrity standards when submitting assessments. We are finalising additional checks to prevent and detect academic misconduct. We’ll keep you updated about this across the term. 

I am not able to arrive on campus for the start of term. Can I access online teaching and learning?

If you are not able to make it to London for the start of term due to travel restrictions, visa delays, health–related issues, or other COVID-19 related circumstances outside of your control, you will be given access to online teaching until you are able to travel to campus.  

Online provisions will vary across departments, but besides pre-recorded or synchronous online lectures, this may take the form of online tutorial sessions, Q and A with faculty, peer study groups for on-campus and online students or similar activity designed to build and strengthen our student community. While we will try to schedule teaching to accommodate students studying remotely, some synchronous teaching may not always be available within normal teaching hours in your location. 

Why are there a reduced number of courses available to students this year?

We have had to make significant changes to teaching and learning for Michaelmas Term, to accommodate new ways of teaching and learning in light of ongoing COVID-19 measures. This means that alongside putting in additional health and wellbeing measures on campus to keep our community safe, we have had to temporarily reduce the number of courses we can offer.

We have made these changes due to the following factors: 

  • From the start of Michaelmas Term, we will be observing social distancing protocols, which reduces the maximum in-person class sizes
  • To ensure equitable access to course for all students, we aim to run each seminar or class twice. This is to accommodate students who may not be able to access a class due to time zone differences, or for students who may have caring responsibilities.

These changes mean that we have fewer available teaching spaces and greater timetabling pressures, which is why are reducing the number of courses available to students this year.  

This has not been an easy decision to make, and we know that students appreciate the variety of courses that LSE offers. Departments have considered carefully which course to continue offering, and which ones to suspend. Departments have kept the course offering as varied as possible, to allow you to select courses to create a pathway through your degree programme that suits you.

Campus life

What's been done to make campus as safe as possible?

Your health and safety is paramount. Across campus and halls of residences, we will introduce enhanced health and safety measures. Where appropriate it is likely that we will go beyond government guidance, based on scientific advice and the expertise of our academic faculty. 

To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, everyone on campus must adhere to the following requirements:

Universal Face Coveringseveryone must wear a face covering over the nose and mouth in School buildings, and in designated campus areas when others are present unless they are exempt from doing so for medical or disability related reasons.

Social Distancingclassrooms, study spaces and communal areas are being reconfigured to provide at least the government recommended distance between people, and while on campus, everyone is expected to maintain this recommended physical distance from others where possible.

Self-Monitoringanyone coming to campus must self-monitor for symptoms and stay at home if they have potentially been exposed to COVID-19 or have had any symptoms over the past two weeks. Anyone with symptoms should self-isolate and get tested for coronavirus. For further guidance on symptoms and related matters please see this NHS page.

Track and Tracewe ask that you use our track and trace system to enable us to look after your health, safety and wellbeing, as well as that of other members of our community.

COVID-19 ReportingIf you test positive for COVID-19 you must self-isolate as per the NHS guidance and inform the School via its track and trace system as soon as possible.

Can I access the Library building?

The Library is open for all students and staff. You can access study spaces and our LSE collections in a socially distanced environment.

We have also worked hard to make core books and texts available online for you to access remotely, and we will continue to add to these collections through the academic year. You can also access one-to-one support online, to help you get the most from the Library and its resources.

Find out how to access Library resources, both online and in-person.

Will the Library close if teaching moves online? 

Whilst teaching remains in-person, the Library will remain open. If we do move to online-only teaching, we will review the current Library access on an ongoing basis, to ensure we are doing our utmost to keep the LSE community safe. We will keep you informed if there are changes to the Library’s current operating model.  

Over the past nine months, we have been working to increase the number of resources available online, to enhance all students’ access to Library materials, whether you’re studying in-person or remotely.  

Will LSE Students' Union be running clubs and societies?

There are lots of ways you can get involved with the Students’ Union this year. Visit the LSESU website for information on what's on and how to join in.

What's being done to make sure my student experience is the best it can be?

We know your experience at LSE is shaped outside of the classroom too, and we will offer you a range of exciting opportunities to develop skills and try new things. 

These include giving back through volunteering, developing your entrepreneurial ideas via LSE Generate, shaping your community through LSE Students’ Union activities and societies and our new online public lecture programme. All activity will start from Welcome 2020, which will be delivered digitally and in-person. You can also access thriving regional alumni groups too, which operate across the globe.

We are committed to working in partnership with you to enhance your experiences and Disability and Wellbeing Services, Careers, Student Advice and LSE LIFE will continue to be available to guide you through the next academic year and beyond through excellent online and in-person services where possible.

What is the advice for students who are ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’, or living with someone who is?

The School is working hard to keep our community safe, well and supported as we begin the new academic year on campus. We are putting in place a range of measures to help make LSE COVID-secure
 
However, it is important that students who are ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’ and students who live with someone who is ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’ read and follow the advice available on the NHS website
 
LSE is making all teaching and learning available online for Michaelmas Term so students who wish to study online for safety reasons can do so until the start of Lent Term. We expect all students to be on campus for teaching and learning from the start of Lent Term.

If you are ‘clinically vulnerable’, or live with someone who is clinically vulnerable, you should also read and follow the advice available on the NHS website.
 
If you would like to speak to a member of staff about your wellbeing on campus please contact the Disability and Wellbeing Service by emailing disabilitydyslexia@lse.ac.uk.

Why do I need to follow LSE’s health and safety measures on campus?

LSE has undertaken extensive and rigourous risk assessments and health and safety assessments on all rooms and communal areas of the LSE campus. 

The measures we are putting in place are designed to keep our community as safe as possible. We are unapologetic about the fact that we will sometimes go beyond UK government guidance on social distancing or the use of face coverings to ensure our campus is safe. 

What if I'm exempt from wearing a face mask?

If you're exempt from wearing a face mask, then you'll need to register as exempt with the Student Wellbeing Service and display an identifying sticker on your LSE ID card. Find out more about registering and collecting your sticker on the student mask exemptions webpage.