What's on this Black History Month

"Black 365- think beyond Black History Month"

Ikenna Acholonu

This year, LSE acknowledges the importance of Black History Month and its purpose of celebrating the Black figures in history that helped to shape not only the Black community, but the entire world. Our theme for this year ‘BLACK 365’ recognises that we must think beyond Black History Month to achieve the world we want for tomorrow.

‘BLACK 365’

Blackness and Black people cannot be constrained. Black thought must radically be told and maintained. Breaking barriers in every time and space. The Black experience cannot be co-opted or replaced. Black people create change. Black struggle overcomes pain. Black joy brings the light.  Black power fuels the fight. Black families build generations. Black cultures inspire nations. Black health and wellness makes us take inventory. Black freedom brings us all to glory. What do we think of Black history? Black beyond the month, Black beyond the hashtags, Black beyond your limitations, Black beyond the stereotypes. Our Black passion will ignite. We craft gold from our fingertips. Elegant and bold, we are not a monolith. A beautiful Black mosaic comes together in community today. Black 365 celebrates Black people everyday.

Reflections on ‘BLACK 365’ by Ikenna Acholonu, Programme Manager of the Uggla Family Scholarship Programme; Co-chair, EmbRace (LSE’s BME staff Network).


 

Forum: LUKI Black History Month Discussion Forum - 1 October, 11:00am to 12:30pm


This forum will bring together BAME colleagues from LSE, UCL, King’s and Imperial (LUKI) to get insights on what is happening at each university's BAME staff network, discuss overall experiences (highs, lows and things in the middle), and This events are for staff who identify as Black, Asian and minority ethnic from the four partnering institutions

Hosted by EmbRace 

Open for LSE Staff only 

Register in advance for this meeting

     

Event: Paris Is Burning Film Screening + QA - 5th October, 7pm - 9pm

 

Paris Is Burning is a 1990 American documentary film directed by Jennie Livingston. Filmed in the mid-to-late 1980s, it chronicles the ball culture of New York City and the African-American, Latino, gay, and transgender communities involved in it. Join us for a viewing of this thought-provoking documentary as part of Black History Month, followed by a Q&A and discussion.

Hosted by LSESU

Location: The Venue, Saw Swee Hock 

Register in advance for this event 

 

Event: Mwangaza Black PhD Students' Outreach Event - 6th October, 3:30 - 5:30pm

 

Black students are the least likely students to apply or get offered a PhD program in the UK. As a result, Black students are the most underrepresented ethnic minority group in PhD candidates  across the country. To counter this, Mwangaza is holding its first student outreach event. The event will offer young black students the opportunity to learn about the PhD experience from current Black PhD students here at LSE and ask any questions they may have. By doing so the event aims to encourage young students to think about pursing a PhD in their future, diversifying the image of knowledge producers.

Hosted by Mwangaza LSE Black Students 

Register in advance to attend 

 

Event: Afro & Caribbean Fusion Dance Class- 7th October 6pm - 7pm 

 

Afro-Caribbean Fusion is a blend of ethnic developments from Africa melded with multicultural Caribbean dance styles. This high-energy dance class introduces traditional rhythms and cultural music and movement from wide variety African and Caribbean dance styles.  Students will experience a range of styles from various countries. The dress code for this class encourages a more traditional feel: Students perform barefoot and wear either a wrap skirt, called a lapa or a sarong, or baggy harem pants to keep with African dance tradition and to add flair to cultural movements.

All abilities welcome! Come and join us! 

Hosted by LSESU

Location: The Venue, Saw Swee Hock

Register in advance for this event 


Workshop: "Mental Health Among The Black Student Community”: Minds Of POC Workshop - 12th October, 3pm- 5pm 

 

This session explores Black identity at University, strength and vulnerability, as well as how to support your Black friends and peers. The aim is to empower students with the tools to recognise and identify Black trauma, and healthy ways to navigate this through the violence presented during your years in Higher Education.

Oge Obioha is one of the co-founders of Minds of POC, a consultancy service focused on improving mental health services for people of colour. She was elected as the Wellbeing Officer for her University in the year 2018/19, where her manifesto had a specific focus on supporting Black students and their mental health, fighting for a culturally competent wellbeing service. During that year, she hosted an event about Black students’ mental health, which tackled racial trauma and the effects on students and their studies. Oge was then elected as President for the year 2019/20, where she led an entire team of officers of colour, collated a 'how to support Black students' guide and continued work with decolonisation across the institution. She now sits on the core team for the Free Black University, an initiative formed by Black radical thinkers that intends to create an anti-colonial, queer space in education.

A discussion hosted by Oge Obioha, co-founder of Minds of People of Colour.

Hosted by LSESU

Location: Online 

Register in advance for this event 

 

Event: LSE's Race Equity Framework - What's Happened Since Summer 2020? - 13 October, 2pm to 3.30pm 

In celebration of Black History Month, we are inviting staff and students to hear updates, ask questions and share their view on LSE’s Race Equity Framework with Sofia Jabeen, Head of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at LSE. 

Questions on the Race Equity Framework can be submitted in advance and in confidence by emailing EDI@lse.ac.uk  Participants can join the conversation via smartphone, laptop, tablet, or any other suitable digital device. For security purposes, only participants with an LSE email address will be admitted to the event.    

Hosted by LSE's Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Division

Open for LSE Staff and Student 
Location: Online 
                                   

Event: Black History Month Comedy Night, 14th October, 7pm - 9pm

Get ready to laugh till you cry as we're joined by the best of London's Black comedy circuit for a night that will give you stitches.

Hosted by LSESU

Location: The Venue, Saw Swee Hock 

Register for this event here

 

Event: In Conversation with Otegha Uwagba, 19th October 2pm - 3pm

Otegha Uwagba (@OteghaUwagba) is a bestselling author and culture journalist who has written three books: the Sunday Times bestseller Little Black Book: A Toolkit for Working Women in 2017, the short essay Whites: On Race And Other Falsehoods, published in 2020 and selected as a Guardian Book of the Year, and the Sunday Times bestseller We Need To Talk About Money, a part memoir, part cultural commentary published in July 2021. She has also contributed to publications including the Guardian, Vogue, The Gentlewoman, The Cut, Dazed, i-D, the Sunday Times, and the New Statesman. In 2018 she was selected for the Forbes 30 Under 30 list, and in 2021 the Sunday Times highlighted her as one of seven young writers “changing the literary world”. She graduated from Oxford with a degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics, and grew up in south London, where she still resides.

Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. She is an alumna of LSE. Her new book, What We Owe Each Other: A New Social Contract, is out now.

Hosted by LSESU and LSE

Open to LSE Staff and Students 

Location: Online 

Register in advance for this event 

 

Event: Re-Imagining the Anti-Racist University -  21st October, 5pm - 6:30pm

 

What will the future of an anti-racist University look like? What can we do to get there as soon as possible?
LSESU in collaboration with EmbRace, present a discussion with Melz Owusu, Founder and Director of the Free Black University, Dr Akile Ahmet, Senior Academic Developer at the Eden Centre, and further panellists to be confirmed.         

Hosted by LSESU and EmbRace     

Open to LSE Staff and Students 

Location: The Venue, Saw Swee Hock 

Register in advance to attend         

 

Event: Black History Month Coffee Break - 22nd October, 1pm - 2pm

 

Join us for the Black History Month Coffee Break. It will be a great opportunity to connect with colleagues around the School in a fun and informal setting. We will explore what it means to be Black 365! All members of the LSE community are welcome!  

Hosted by LSE EmbRace 

Open to LSE Staff and Students 

Register for this meeting in advance 

 

Workshop: Strength Through Culture Workshop - 25th October, 1pm - 2pm

 

The workshop will be led by Ayan Ali, LSE Staff and Student Counsellor. Start your week on a positive note. Join this Monday lunchtime online workshop to celebrate culture as a source of confidence and resistance in hard times, especially when we experience being othered or discriminated against because of our ethnicity.

  • How much of our heritage culture do we feel comfortable bringing into our working environment?
  • Which cultural ties do we want to discover or strengthen

We’ll discuss big and small everyday things we can do to connect with our heritage in a meaningful way such as food, clothing, hair, music, art and stories. This workshops are for staff who identify as Black, Asian and minority ethnic.

Hosted by LSE EmbRace and Ayan Ali

Open to LSE Staff only 

Register for this workshop in advance 

Event: Food Festival - 26th October, 11am - 3pm 

 

Send your tastebuds across the world with stalls and food trucks offering a variety of dishes from across the Black diaspora, including Nigerian, Caribbean, and Ghanaian dishes.

Hosted by LSESU

Location: Sheffield Street 

Seminar Series: Black Women and Political Leadership in the US - 26th October, 6:00 - 7:30pm

 

This joint Department of International History and LSE Phelen US Centre talk explores Black Women’s Political leadership in the past and present in the US. Associate Professor Anastasia Curwood’s talk will draw on her upcoming book, Aim High: Shirley Chisholm and Black Feminist Power Politics, to discuss the timeless threads connecting US Black women’s political concerns across time. She will provide historical context for Black women’s activism and explain how Chisholm developed a Black feminist power framework within national politics.

Professor Nadia E. Brown’s talk will draw on her recently published book Sister Style: The Politics of Appearance for Black Women Political Elites and discuss the aesthetics of Black women's politics with a focus on contemporary political figures such as Kamala Harris. Black women political elites in the US manage their appearance and politics in response to White supremacy, sexism, and racism. Professor Brown will argue that aesthetics and ideas are interwoven and have long roots which build on the legacies of Shirley Chisholm.

Part of the Race and Gender Seminar Series, co-hosted by Dr Imaobong Umoren and Professor Matthew Jones

This series will unite historians and political scientists to reflect on the longer arch historically of issues such as white supremacy, sexism, police brutality, and the global Black Lives Matter movement.

Register for this event in advance

 

Event: LSE's Race Equity Framework - What's Happened Since Summer 2020? -  27th October , 2:00pm - 3:30pm 

 

In celebration of Black History Month, we are inviting staff and students to hear updates, ask questions and share their view on LSE’s Race Equity Framework with Sofia Jabeen, Head of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at LSE. 

Questions on the Race Equity Framework can be submitted in advance and in confidence by emailing EDI@lse.ac.uk  Participants can join the conversation via smartphone, laptop, tablet, or any other suitable digital device. For security purposes, only participants with an LSE email address will be admitted to the event.

Hosted by LSE's Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Division

Open to LSE Staff and Students

Location: Online 

Register in advance for this event 

 

Seminar Series: The Slow Death of Sagon Penn: Police Violence in Reagan-Era San Diego - 9th November, 6:00- 7:30pm

 

Hosted by US Centre, Adriane Lentz-Smith (Duke University)

In the second seminar, Dr. Adriane Lentz-Smith (Duke University) will use the case of Sagon Penn, a young black martial-arts expert who was acquitted of the murder of a white police officer in 1985, to examine police racism and violence in Reagan-era San Diego.

This series will unite historians and political scientists to reflect on the longer arch historically of issues such as white supremacy, sexism, police brutality, and the global Black Lives Matter movement.

Part of the Race and Gender Seminar Series, co-hosted by Dr Imaobong Umoren and Professor Matthew Jones

This event is free and open to the public with limited places, available on a first come first served basis. You will be able to register for this event from 26 October 2021.

Other Resources

 

Podcast: The Politics of Race in American Film Podcast Series   

The Politics of Race in American Film is a limited podcast series from the LSE US Centre, hosted by Dr Clive James Nwonka, and released in the spring of 2021. Over five episodes, this podcast explores what makes film such a powerful lens for understanding race, politics & society.

Blog: LSE United States American Politics and Policy

What Black Lives Matter can learn from the 1960s struggle for Civil Rights 

The Baldwin/Buckley Debate Of 1965, And How Baldwin Won It 

Understanding the future of Black politics means understanding the future of the Black church