FAQs for students

Information for undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers

LSE remains committed to being a truly international community of staff and students. Openness and international diversity will remain essential to life at LSE, no matter what the future may hold.

Leaving the EU will not happen overnight – there will be a gradual exit process, with significant opportunities to seek assurances and influence future policy.

These FAQs cover a number of key issues that may affect LSE students.

How will Brexit affect current students?

The immigration status of all current EU students, along with fee status and access to student loans, has not changed as a result of the UK's decision to leave the EU.

This will remain the case until the UK Government decides otherwise. LSE will be working to influence the Government as policy develops.

If you’re an EU citizen, you and your family will be able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme to continue living in the UK after 30 June 2021.

From 21 January 2019, a voluntary pilot for the scheme is open to all EU citizens and their non-EU family members.

The scheme will fully open by March 2019. The deadline for applying is 30 June 2021. Please see further guidance provided by the UK government here.

On Monday 21 January, the UK Prime Minister announced that anyone who applies and pays for the cost of an application (or has already applied and paid) during the test phases will receive a refund. Details of the refund process will be published by the Government shortly and we will provide an update about this when possible. 

Will student fees be affected?

The Government has confirmed that students from other EU countries who are currently at English universities and those starting in 2019/20 will remain eligible for home fee status. Students will also be able to access financial support for the duration of their course as per existing guidelines. 

For more information, visit the Gov.uk website.

Will LSE bursaries for EU students be affected?

Current students from the UK and the EU are eligible for an LSE bursary depending on their household income.

Visit the Financial Support Office webpages and LSE Busaries pages to find out more.

How will Brexit affect student loans for EU students?

The Government has confirmed that students from other EU countries who are currently at UK universities will receive student loan support for the duration of their course.

The Government has also announced that EU students applying for a place at English universities in 2019-20 will continue to be eligible for financial support for the duration of their course. 

For more information, visit the Gov.uk website. 

Will there be any changes to Erasmus?

LSE remains committed to the Erasmus + programme until 2020. No alternative has yet been provided to Erasmus + as part of the UK's exit negotiations.

Find out more about Erasmus at LSE here

In July 2018, the UK Government extended a commitment on EU funding to underwrite the payments of all competitive grants to include centralised Erasmus+ actions until the end of 2020. Updates from the UK Government and British Council on the UK's position in Erasmus + can be found on the following web pages:

Technical Notice on Erasmus+ in the UK if there’s no Brexit deal

Brexit Update

Will this result affect students from outside the EU?

The referendum result has no implications for the immigration status or associated fee status of current students from outside the EU.

In December 2018, the Government published its Immigration White Paper. This sets out plans for the UK’s post-Brexit immigration policy.

The Immigration Bill, which sets out the statutory framework for the future immigration system, will begin its passage through Parliament from 14 January. The Government will be consulting on the more specific Immigration Rules and LSE will be responding to set out our position. 

How might Brexit impact student careers internationally?

EU students will continue to be able to take advantage of the free movement of workers within the EU as long as the UK remains a member. This will remain the case until the Government decides otherwise.

Regardless of any potential changes to rules on free movement of labour, LSE Careers has excellent relationships with many international recruiters, and all LSE students will be in a strong position to access opportunities both inside and outside the EU.

For current LSE students and graduates, LSE Careers offers one-to-one advice and guidance. For more information, see a blog about what 'leave' means for graduate jobs from the Director of LSE Careers, Jenny Blakesley.

How will this result affect LSE’s partnership with Sciences Po and the current double degree?

Students on Sciences Po double degrees that have started at LSE in 2018-19 are already confirmed and will not be affected.

LSE already has a number of successful international partnerships and double-degree courses with universities outside the EU.

We expect that the partnership with Sciences Po, and the double degree, will continue to thrive after any government decisions on EU negotiations.

What will happen to existing research project funding?

The Government has committed to underwrite payments of Horizon 2020 awards to cover grant applications after the UK leaves the EU and the UK’s allocation for structural and investment fund projects as part of the EU’s 2020 budget.

The Government has also stated its intention to negotiate associated status with the new Horizon Europe programme, and is expected to pursue this goal going forward.

 More information can be found at at the Gov.UK website.

What does this mean for future research funding?

UK researchers are able to continue to make applications to Horizon 2020 until any withdrawal from the EU is complete.The extent of UK participation in future EU research programmes will depend on domestic decisions by the UK government, and negotiations with the EU.

The Government has stated that it is “determined to ensure that the UK continues to play a leading role in European and international research.”

The School will continue to work with our partners in the Russell Group to push the UK government to clarify the position of the UK science community with respect to the EU research programmes.

If your research funding or EU collaborations have been affected by the vote to leave the EU, please send details of your experiences to Jon Deer – J.Deer@lse.ac.uk – in the Research and Innovation Division.

Will there be an impact on opportunities for collaboration with our EU partner organisations?

There will be no immediate impact on collaborations or projects.

The number of opportunities in the future may partly depend on the decisions by the UK Government following negotiations with the EU.

LSE has strong established ties with many universities and organisations both inside and outside the EU.

Colleagues with ongoing projects or who are considering submitting new proposals to Horizon 2020 can contact the LSE Research and Innovation Division for more information and up-to-date advice.